the best indie press books i’ve ever read

Rather than do a year end list or anything like that, I’ve decided to just talk about what books I think are the best ones that I’ve read since I started reading indie back in, like, 2008. These are in no order, but just kind of grouped by writer because it’s easier for me to remember them that way. This is by no means a complete list of the best indie books published in the last however many years. These are just the best of what I read.

No preamble!

Ledfeather by Stephen Graham Jones, FC2

The Bird is Gone: A Manifesto by Stephen Graham Jones, FC2

I’ve read both of these books by Stephen about four times, and they keep getting better. I’m not sure if I’d love contemporary literature as much without these novels. They’re some of my favorite books written in history, and I rank Ledfeather right up there with anything by Virginia Woolf or Ursula K Le Guin, which is a big compliment, if you’re me.

The Book of Lazarus by Richard Grossman, FC2

Girl with Oars & Man Dying by JA Tyler, Aqueous Press

Water by JA Tyler, Civil Coping Mechanisms

JA Tyler is endlessly underrate and overlooked. He’s maybe the most innovative writer in indie lit, and some day he’ll get his recognition. He published some of the best and most transformative books of the last decade and he wrote several of them too. More people need to love JA Tyler. More people need to be like him.

The Natural Dissolution of Fleeting-Improvised Men by Gabriel Blackwell, Civil Coping Mechanisms

The Alligators of Abraham by Robert Kloss, MudLuscious Press

I have almost too much to say about this novel. I think it’s the best book to come out of indie lit ever. Like, far and away so much better and impressive than anything else the rest of us are even trying to do.

We Take Me Apart by Molly Gaudry, MudLuscious Press

Beautiful and perfect. One of the books that introduced me to the wonderful world of indie lit and I revisit this book pretty often. Still waiting on whatever comes next from Molly. She’s another secret genius.

Poisonhorse by Brandi Wells, MudLuscious Press

Billie the Bull by xTx, MudLuscious Press

Wasn’t really a fan of xTx until this little book. It’s nearly perfect. It might even be completely perfect.

Black God by Ben Spivey, Blue Square Press

This novel, man. It’s almost too much. It’s like reading your own brain falling apart and rotting in your skull. But somehow beautiful and just as heartbreaking. This is a book everyone should read.

American Monster by JS Breukelaar, Lazy Fascist Press

The closest a book’s come to Samuel R Delany’s Dhalgren probably ever. Breukelaar is one of the best new writers around and I can’t wait for whatever comes next. Read this book. There’s really nothing else like it.

The Collected Works of Scott McClanahan: Volume 1 by Scott McClanahan, Lazy Fascist Press

If you don’t know Scott McClanahan, what have you been doing with your life? Funny and heartbreaking and amazing. These are the kinds of stories I would never be interested in if you told me what they were about, but I’m not sure there’s a better reading experience than a McClanahan book.

No by Ocean Vuong, Yes Yes Books

He makes me want to be a poet again, which is something I gave up on back in high school. Since reading this, I’ve written four poetry collections. So, yes, you should read this.

Collected Alex by AT Grant, Caketrain Press

Rain of the Future by Valerie Mejer, Action Books

Dark Matter by Aase Berg, Black Ocean

Butcher’s Tree by Feng Sun Chen, Black Ocean

Ordinary Sun by Matthew Henriksen, Black Ocean

Rather than talk about these books individually, I’ll just say you need to be reading Black Ocean. Every book they put out is pure brilliance.

Edie & The Low-hung Hands by Brian Allen Carr, Small Doggies Press

Brian Allen Carr, another underrate and unknown genius. No one writes like him. No one even thinks like him. I think he may be insane, but it’s the kind of insanity that makes me want to follow him to the ends of the earth.

Dermaphoria by Craig Clevenger, MacAdam Cage

Watering Heaven by Peter Tieryas Lie, Signal 8 Press

Understories by Tim Horvath, Bellevue Literary Press

Quintessence of Dust by Craig Wallwork, KUBOA Press

These three collections by Wallwork, Horvath, and Tieryas are the best collections to come out of indie lit, in terms of quality and diversity. They’re full of big ideas, beautiful worlds, and so much humanity. I don’t typically like short story collections, but these are probably the best ones to read outside of Yasunari Kawabata.

Town of Shadows by Lindsay Stern, Scrambler Books

This little book comes from another dimension, I swear. I’ve Sterns next book as well and it’s somehow even better. Stern is too young to be this good but she writes stories I wish I could write and she writes them in ways I never thought possible. She very well could become my new favorite writer if she keeps this up.

The Empty City by Berit Ellingsen

Beneath the Liquid Skin by Berit Ellingsen, Queen’s Ferry Press

Berit’s books are so different but so perfect. Beneath the Liquid Skin is a collection of fantasy stories that are so full of originality and oddness that they feel like they come from nothing and nowhere. And then The Empty City is so perfect in its quietness. It’s a beautiful book about silence. And, if you follow this site, you know that’s probably my favorite thing. I’ve read her next book as well, and it’s perfect. More people need to know Berit’s work, because she’s one of the true originals.

The Word Book by Mieko Kanai, Dalkey Archive Press

Witz by Joshua Cohen, Dalkey Archive Press

A Heaven of Others by Joshua Cohen, Starcherone Books

Discovered him through Steve Erickson, who’s probably my hero, and I fell in love with Cohen’s work. He’s up there with Kloss, writing so much better than the rest of us could ever hope. And these two books are so completely different that it’s hard to imagine one person doing such disparate things so much better than you can do any one single thing.

The House Enters the Street by Gretchen Henderson, Starcherone Press

The Half-Finished Heaven by Tomas Transtromer, Graywolf Press

For All the Wretched, Beautiful & Insignificant Things So Uselessly & Carelessly Destroyed  by Hosho McCreesh, sunnyoutside press

Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link, Mariner Books

We Make Mud by Peter Markus, Dzanc Books

What Precision, Such Restraint by Phil Jourdan, Perfect Edge Books

I hated this book when I read it. If Phil wasn’t a friend, I probably never would’ve finished it. But it’s a collection that keeps brewing in my skull, and it grows on me more and more each month. The entire book is an experiment, and one I’ve never seen attempted. I think the whole is better than the individual stories, but that whole is probably one of the greatest literary tricks I’ve ever experienced. Phil’s a wizard, children. He also makes groovy tunes.

The Orange Eats Creeps by Grace Krilanovich, Two Dollar Radio

I think indie lit began here for a lot of us. Again, discovered her through Steve Erickson and I’m so glad I did. I love this novel, though it’s by no means an easy one to read or love. It’s chaotic and beautiful and grotesque. It’s hobo junky vampire teens and it’s absolutely brilliant. I wish she had more novels out because I need more of her. The world needs more of her work.

Through the Arc of the Rainforest by Karen Tei Yamashita, Coffee House Press

the last of the year in interviews

The final interview of the yearlong weekly interview series brings us back to the man who started it all. It’s JA Tyler’s birthday today, and this is my interview with him at Monkeybicycle. I’ve known JA for a few years now and he’s truly an amazing person, and he does so much for the writing community and young writers like me. He’s a pleasure to talk to, to know, and he always has great advice. Along with that, he’s one of my favorite writers, and, I think, one of the best around, so it’s an honor to call him a friend.

Read his interview and then buy his books. All of them, probably.

I spent last night with Girl with Oars & Man Dying again, almost exactly two years after I first read it. It’s magic and it’s beautiful and it’s perfect. It’s sublime. I love it.

What else? Bart, Bonnie, and Charlie are in town, so we had a very good time the other night, which caused me to spend yesterday sort of a ruinous wreck of human, but tonight we’ll do it again, this time with the Hambro, who’s always a pleasure to see. Just went to the library to get some of the books I requested, so I should have some goodness to occupy my time before they arrive.

I have one more post to write before the year is done, and it’ll be a recap of the year, because that’s what you do, yeah?

Still not sure what to do for New Year’s but Lake & Irving seems to be where I’ll end up.

Lake & Irving is a restaurant started by my good friend Dewey and his brother, Chris. Both of them are graduates of the Culinary Institute of America, and Chris has, I think, ten years of experience as a chef at a Hawaiian 5-Star resort, so they come pretty decorated. More than that, they just make awesome food at a reasonable price. Lots of great beers, too, and the interior is so perfect. I really should write a proper post about it soon, but just know that it’s a great restaurant and bar here in Uptown, so if you live in the Twin Cities, treat yourself to some amazing food for a good price.

But, yeah, I guess that’s it. Still doing research on the giant monster novel, which still just means watching godzilla and Evangelion and so on, but the project grows and I’m excited to start writing it. Also, should have cover art soon for a very cool surprise.

It’s 45 degrees out and it’ll be -10 tomorrow, so I think I may try to do anything outside.

Till next time, which will probably be Monday or Tuesday or whenever I have time.

Oh, almost forgot to mention, the indiegogo campaign just broke the $1,700 mark! So many great rewards still to be claimed.

Thanks to everyone who’s been so helpful.

sausage making

As we do every year on the solstice, tonight the family makes sausage, which my dad calls the sausage party. It’s one of the greatest days of the year! Drinks and food and making forty pounds of sausage.

Anyrate, my interview with Robert Kloss and Amber Sparks went up this week. They’re awesome, and this is also the first full interview of the interview series. Next week will be the incredible JA Tyler to round out the year.

I can’t remember what I wanted to say in here. It’s been an odd week, I guess. I keep feeling all these projects rising and I just keep putting my head down and trying to do work for money. I think it’s a difficult time of year to find work, maybe. Or I’ve just been unlucky.

The indiegogo campaign has slowed considerably, but that’s okay. I imagine people are busy with the holidays and so on. I’ll pick up pushing it after, I think.

 

And if you don’t feel like giving to me, think about giving to Gregory Sherl.

 

He’s struggled with OCD for several years and he needs money to get well.

25 influential books

This is going around facebook but I don’t think I could stick it to just ten so I’m going to give myself this larger but equally arbitrary number for my list. These are books that stayed with me/changed me/on and on. There’s no specific order beyond the first two.

1. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky – This may not be Dostoevsky’s best, but it’s my favorite, and it’s the first one I read. It literally changed my life. It changed every bit of me. It changed the way I saw the world, the way the world felt, the way I thought and still think. I think it’s the novel that caused me to give up my anger. It taught me how to live. It taught me everything I know about life. It broke my heart over and over and I wept into the pages. Not cried, but wept big alligator tears as my heart sort of fractured and disintegrated in Russia so long ago. It tore me apart and broke me to pieces for so long and then it rebuilt me slowly. Raskolnikov is so deep inside me, so fused to my life that I think Dostoevsky’s still building me, still trying to get me right. I read it twice the first week I held it in my hands. I read it four times by the end of that year, and I’m afraid to even pick it up. I have a few different translations of it but can never make it past the first couple pages. Not because I don’t like it anymore, but because I’m afraid of what’ll happen.

2. A Season in Hell / Illuminations by Arthur Rimbaud – You’re only sixteen once and so you only get to discover the perfect books for you at that age once. This, along with Crime and Punishment defined my sixteenth year, and just about every year after that. This is when I still thought I was a poet, or at least when I was desperately trying to write the perfect line, and then Rimbaud disemboweled language for me. Everything I thought I knew about what words could do and what they could be shifted radically, and, still, every year I reread these, discovering more each time it drains into my brain. It invigorates me and it’s one of those cures for when I get absurdly depressed about the world I exist in.

3. The Waves by Virginia Woolf – Like Rimbaud, this just radically changed what I understood language to be and what it could do. It transformed narrative for me, and I still consider it maybe one of the only perfect novels I’ve ever read. It’s sublime and untouchable and she writes so beautifully that it makes you want to quit, but it’s also endlessly inspiring, pushing me harder and deeper.

4. The Magus by John Fowles – This is the novel that taught me that language needn’t be difficult or overpowering for a novel to be absolutely brilliant. It transformed what I understood about narrative once more, and it broke my heart. It’s beautiful and nearly perfect. And it begins so quietly, so unassumingly. The first 100 pages took me about a week to read and the next 600 took me about two days. It’s like falling into a kaleidoscope and hoping to never find your way back out, and even when the novel ends, you’re still trapped in the whirlwind, just hurting, just loving. And then the world shines, but from a new light. One you didn’t know could exist.

5. Moby Dick by Herman Melville – I don’t even really have words for this novel. It’s unstoppable. It’s one of the few perfect novels ever written and I could live in that language, in that world forever. It taught me so much about what a novel can be. Forget narrative and character and the language. It taught me that a novel can be so much more than just words or even just an experience. A novel can be this grand neverending world that exists nowhere but feels realer than the world around you.

6. A Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin – Like many people in love with literary fiction and its genre constraints, I rarely read any genre fiction, which is a huge oversight in my reading that I began correcting a few years ago. That’s when I fell into this. Read the first five novels, all 5,000 pages, in about three months. If you want to see what plot can do, just pick one of these up. The writing’s not perfect, but he creates a world so profoundly complex and large and characters so real they drip off the page. But the greatest achievement, I think, even beyond all the mythos and legends and so on, is the unrelenting pacing of these novels.

7. Parallel Stories by Peter Nadas – I’ve been talking about this novel so much for the last two years it’s strange to think that I might have even more to say. But it’s perfect. It’s perfect in every way, even in the ways it fails. And Nadas does so many things that shouldn’t work. He takes a moment, literally a single moment, and stretches it over fifty or one hundred pages, and it’s somehow never boring. It’s invigorating. I generally dislike sex scenes in fiction because I think they’re pretty boring, but he writes these enormous scenes centered around just a minute of sex and cast over so many pages, and it’s the greatest writing I’ve ever read. Nadas is a master. Maybe the only one at his level living, and his enormous crumbling cathedral of a novel is absolutely sublime.

8. Soul Mountain by Gao Xingjian – Imagine a Chinese Milan Kundera, and imagine him doing what Kundera does, but somehow better. Honestly, I used to always say that no writer writes like Kundera because no one could possibly pull off what he does, and then I fell into Soul Mountain. Part memoir, part ethnography, part history of the Cultural Revolution and Maoist China, part political treatise, part ecological report, part mythology, part noir, part travelogue, part mythology, part metaphysical exploration of the self and nation. It’s enormous and so beautiful, so readable, so perfect.

9. Our Ecstatic Days by Steve Erickson – Ever since I’ve read Erickson, I’ve been preaching his name to whoever will listen. As far as I’m concerned, he’s the greatest living american author, and my favorite writer maybe ever. He changed me in ways that haven’t happened since Dostoevsky, and so maybe this should be at the beginning of this list too. And, really, I could put any of his novels here. People had been telling me about Erickson forever, telling me how much I’d love his work, but I always just sort of wandered off to some other book. And then I discovered his first novel, Days Between Stations, at a secondhand shop in Dublin. Everything’s been different since then. I wouldn’t be the writer I am today without him. I wouldn’t have ever been able to write a novel without him. His writing taught me that I could be the writer I wanted to be. I didn’t need to fit into a niche or some other well-trodden path of literature. I could carve my own way, write the stories I wanted to read and live in. I read most of his books twice the first year I found him, and I think this is his best. But it also only works at this level if you’ve read all the novels published previous to this one. It’s a gargantuan achievement, how he ties all of his novels together into a single world constantly in flux. Steve Erickson is a giant and we’re lucky to have him and you should read him now.

10. Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu – If Crime and Punishment taught me how to live, then Lao Tzu taught me how to be human.

11. The Stranger by Albert Camus – Along with the Tao Te Ching, this novel taught me how to be human. Its influence is still felt today, and, outside of that, it’s just a great novel. It’s another book I discovered at the right time that led me to read everything he ever wrote. I think The Fall is probably a better novel and maybe even taught me more about what it means to be ydde, but I’m sticking with The Stranger because of what it opened up to me.

12. Factotum by Charles Bukowski – I actually don’t think Bukowski is very good anymore, bu he was extremely important to me when I was younger. Back when I was hating the world, drinking way too much, so angry and depressed about existence, he was the one who sort of tempered my anger and pushed me towards creation. I wouldn’t be the same person without Bukowski but I find him one of the hardest writers to return to.

13. The Dispossessed by Ursula K Le Guin – This is a brilliant novel by one of the greatest novelists around. Read this while I was simultaneously seriously studying anarchism and it sort of opened up the world to me. Not only that, but it opened up the ability in me to dramatise politics in a way I never thought possible before. From here, I’ve read a great number of her books, though there are still many more to read. That’s one of the delights of discovering a prolific master.

14. Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata – Taught me what beauty really is. It fell so perfectly into my head and my constructs of reality that, rather than shift who and what I was, it crystallised aspects of me. And ever since reading this, I’ve chased after his delicate beauty, that brilliance. It’s not my favorite of his books or even his best, but I think it captures this aesthetic best.

15. Bird is Gone: A Manifesto by Stephen Graham Jones – This isn’t Stephen’s best or even my favorite, but it’s the one that does things I can still barely wrap my head around. It’s a novel I didn’t even begin to understand until I read it the second time, and every read becomes better, fuller, more rich. It taught me the importance of rereadability, and how important that is to a novel. Ever since reading this, I’ve always sought to get that subtlety and shifting quality that he captures here. And I could put so many of Stephen’s books here. Especially Ledfeather. Always and forever. My whole life caught in that little book, which also has the unique quality of being unputdownable. If I read that first page, I’ll be reading the last page in a few hours. I’ve read it four times, all of them in one sitting, the last three times accidentally, usually way too late at night.

16. Collected Stories by Amy Hempel – I don’t think you can read Hempel and return to writing the same way. I read this around the same time as I read Jesus’ Son by Denis Johnson and Thom Jones’ short stories, and while I think all of these are pretty similar, I think Hempel does it best. Her aesthetic is so strong and so near perfect. If you want to learn how to write a sentence so full it’s nearly bursting, pick up anything by Hempel.

17. Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link -Read this at a time when I forgot how great short stories could be. Such a unique and brilliant imagination, and just unstoppably great. Link is definitely one of the best around. Should probably put Yiyun Li here, too, since I read it around the same time, and though it’s unbelievably different, it captures that same kind of brilliance. Yoko Ogawa, too.

18. Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card – This was the first novel to make me cry. I read it when I was, like, eleven, or something, and I just started bawling. I’d tell you at which part, but that might ruin things. I didn’t know books could do that to me. I didn’t know words could effect me like that. It changed everything I knew about art [which, at that point, was not very much] and I’ve read this book several times, always loving it, always learning from it. Card may be a reprehensible person, but he wrote a near perfect book about 25 years ago.

19. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez – I don’t even know what to say about this novel. It does so much and so perfectly. I still think about it quite often and there are scenes here that will never leave me. It influenced a great deal of my writing without me every really even realising it. Especially, maybe, my obsessions with circles.

20. The Female Man by Joanna Russ – Just brilliant and visceral. Should probably include Kathy Acker’s Empire of the Senseless and Samuel R Delany’s Nerveryon here, since they’re all so related in my head. They talk about gender and identity in ways that I never really thought about before, but that also fit so perfect and right in my head, in the way I had always looked at the world. It wasn’t so much as a revelation like having your eyes opened but more like someone turning on the light and realising you’re not alone in the dark with all these thoughts. And they’re all just brilliant books, too.

21. Rashomon and Seventeen Other Stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa – Just read these stories and discover how great short stories can be. Each one is so different and so perfect.

22. Nightwood by Djuna Barnes – Just unbelievable. Right when I was getting past how perfect language could be, I fell into this and sort of wanted to live there forever. Djuna Barnes writes like she’s on fire and the apocalypse is everywhere, but it’s also hilarious.

23. Girl with Oars and Man Dying by JA Tyler – I don’t understand why more people haven’t read this novel. It’s a fairytale and it’s beautiful and heartbreaking, and maybe my favorite JA Tyler novel, which is really saying quite a lot. It’s perfect, in every way, and it gave me that open eyed awe sensation that art’s meant to give you, but that I had almost forgotten about.

24. The Tempest by William Shakespeare – This, of all Shakespeare’s plays, influences me the most on a day to day basis. I think about it more than I can really explain. It’s so full of ideas and wonder. It’s literally bursting with awesome, and I still just want to live in it. It does everything so well, and it’s probably his best play for its versatility and depth.

25. The White Hotel by DM Thomas – Like Erickson, discovered this in a halfpriced bookstore after hearing about Thomas for a long time. It’s absolutely brilliant and on fire. It captures life in brutal and hallucinogenic tones and shades and hues. I’ve read several of his novels and this is still the best, I think, and also the most unique and perfectly realised.

So that’s the list as it stands today. It’s surprisingly western. I think if I had made this list last year or even the year before, you’d see a lot more asian and latin american writers on there, but I guess that’s why I’m allowed to make lists whenever I want. There are also few women on here, but that’s just the way the list happened. All kinds of people I forgot to make room for, too, but I’m sticking with my list and I’ll defend it to THE DEATH!

Maybe I’ll make one every year just to see what happens. Dostoevsky and Rimbaud are so fused to me that they’ll always be on here. Same with Woolf and Erickson, but a lot of the rest is probably up for grabs.

All right. Off to do other things.

Oh, also, wanted to mention my indigogo campaign again.

It’s insane what we’ve raised already, but there’s still a long way to go. Lots of great rewards still available and my eternal gratitude, always. And thank you to everyone who’s donated and contributed. I’ll be saying this many times over the coming weeks, but I’ll always mean it just as much.

revenge of the scammed

Lots to update everyone on. I’ll start out with posting the interviews I’ve published in the last month:

Fish Bites Cops! by David James Keaton. Interview published 4/12/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

Understories by Tim Horvath. Interview published 27/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

My Pet Serial Killer and The Laughter of Strangers by Michael J Seidlinger. Interview published 21/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

The House Enters the Street by Gretchen Henderson. Interview published 16/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

The Shape of Blue by Liz Scheid. Interview published 6/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

Can’t believe it’s been so long since I updated, especially since I planned on doing it every day during November.

Anyrate, as many of you know, I’ve been defrauded. Nate Tower and so many others have helped me organise a very cool campaign to try to recoup my losses. I’m out $2,000 and I’ll write a proper post about the whole thing later. Maybe this weekend. But, for now, just check out the indiegogo campaign.

So check out The Revenge of the Scammed Anthology.

More than just helping me recoup my losses, it’s full of very cool content. The Anthology is going to be killer and then people like Ryan W Bradley, Charles Spitzack, J David Osborne, and so many others are providing amazing things for backers.

Here’s a list of the anthology contributors:

  • Jesus Angel Garcia
  • David S. Atkinson
  • Allie Marini Batts
  • Ryan W Bradley
  • Paul D Brazil
  • Darlene Campos
  • Garrett Cook
  • Sandy Barrett Ebner
  • Rory Fleming
  • Susan Gibb
  • Michael Gonzalez
  • Amanda Gowin
  • Douglas Hackle
  • Sally Heymann
  • Don Lawson
  • William Lemon
  • h. l. nelson
  • J David Osborne
  • Alex Pruteanu
  • Stephen V Ramey
  • Matt Rowan
  • Robyn Ryle
  • Michael J. Seidlinger
  • Grergory Sherl
  • Ryan Shoemaker
  • Sam Snoek-Brown
  • Ben Tanzer
  • Susan Tepper
  • Refe Tuma
  • Richard Thomas
  • Nathaniel Tower
  • Robert Vaughan

And, if you’re a fan of me doing things, there are all sorts of things I’m personally offering, such as my first novel, Ash Cinema, drawings, paintings, videos of me singing, personal biographies and novellas, and even my editing skills.

So, for this holiday season, help a poor wild ydde out and he’ll repay you in content!

It really means so much to me that this has been put together. I can’t explain how grateful I am and I’ll never be able to thank everyone enough.

So just know I love you and appreciate all you’ve ever done for me.

new novel

Some big news: my novel Noir: A Love Story will be coming out July 2014 from Civil Coping Mechanisms. CCM is doing awesome things and I’m super excited to be a part of their growing catalogue, being published by the same people who published one of my favorite writers, JA Tyler, and my favorite title by him, Water. Check out the whole catalogue here and see what’s coming here.

So what is Noir: A Love Story? I’ll keep it short for now, but more will come in the year ahead. A whole year. It’ll probably be best for me to just not think about it until next May. Anyway, Noir: A Love Story is the first novel I ever completed and I did that a little over two years ago. Or, not a little over, more like 30 months ago. I’d say it’s been a long, hard road to publication, but that’s not true. I mostly sat on it, which is problematic, but I’m getting better at submitting things. Anyway, it started from a joke, betting myself that I’d write a novel by Friday [this only a few months after finally becoming comfortable with being a writer who would never write a novel (I now have five written)], and so I started the following morning and by Friday I had a first draft. Saturday I read through it, amazed at what I had, and then I put it in the order it’s in now. I honestly expected to spend months editing that novel because of how quickly it came out, but I truly believe it came out just about perfect, and it remains, more or less, untouched since that Saturday when I shifted all the chapters around to put them in the best order.

I had always wanted to read a novel that could be read in any order but had never found one till I came across Richard Grossman’s The Book of Lazarus, and while my novel and that novel share no similarities, I’d say that’s one thing I accomplished with Noir: A Love Story. There are twenty six narrators all speaking about two people whom they didn’t know or barely knew. It is a detective novel without the detective. It is magic realism and american. It is habitual suicide and the howling frustrations of youth. It’s a novel about many things but all of that’s up to the reader. I could keep talking about this forever so I’ll probably just stop.

But one thing: I’ve written five novels and hundreds of short stories and I honestly believe this is my favorite thing I’ve written. That changes, of course, with each new novel written, but this one keeps coming back to me. I think I’ve perhaps written better things, but nothing that I love quite so dearly as this.

But maybe that’s everyone’s first novel.

We only get one first love, yes?

Anyrate, tracked down the post I made immediately after finishing it. Take a look at September 3, 2010 and see how the process went.

Oh, too, about 3,000 words and 44 pages into the new graphic novel. It’s highly surreal and more a collection of moods and short journeys by an eternal transdimensional man who forever lives his life over and over in different iterations but never remembering the previous world he travelled through. Really digging it and hoping to be done soon. My first graphic novel only ended up being about 8,000 words, and while this will be longer, it’s also much less narratively focused. This is my soundtrack by Ludovico Einaudi:

I’m enjoying the writing very much. I’ll leave you with an image by Kyle Thompson:

Take care, StarChild.

forgot some things

Yeah, so I thought I’d link them now.

The Best Books of 2012 went up at Manarchy a while ago. It’s one of the most liked articles on the site! But, yes, it’s a few lists compiling my favorite books I read over last year, and since I read over 100, it’s a list that matters. I guess. Or something.

My review of The Alligators of Abraham by Robert Kloss also went up at Word Riot a few weeks ago, or maybe only last week. I don’t know. Seems like a long time ago.

Also, I bought my website now. Not really sure why but I guess it makes me more official. Need to update my publications page too. All kinds of broken links in there that need to be fixed.

Anycase, Washington DC in three days, so I can be with my lady love.

Also also, novel’s coming along. Hit the 90k mark a few minutes ago. Want to reach 100k before I leave for the long weekend.

Wish me luck.

Picture!