the song of the black mages

My story about Vivi from FFIX came out from Cartridge Lit last week, which has to be the coolest idea for a magazine ever. Literature influenced and about videogames. It’s perfect.

The story’s called The Song of the Black Mages and is the first of many stories I’ve written/am writing about Vivi that takes place between the last battle of FFIX and its ending cinematic. I hope you dig it.

Over at Entropy I have a few things going on as well.

Short Film of the Week: On Your Mark by Hayao Miyazaki

Short Film of the Week: Red by Jorge Jaramillo & Carlo Guillot

Sunday Entropy List: Favorite Animated Films

Editors’ List: Favorite Books Translated into English

And then I’ll also just remind people that Girl with Ears & Demon with Limp is only a dollar and Twilight of the Wolves is only three, so go out and get them! They take place in the same world and are amongst my best writing, I think.

Oh, also, go buy Green Lights by Kyle Muntz! Read a review at HTMLGiant.

And since we’re talking about books released, a whole load of them were just released by Lazy Fascist Press, which means all kinds of awesome. Pay special attention to Michael J Seidlinger and Brian Allen Carr.

revenge of the scammed

Lots to update everyone on. I’ll start out with posting the interviews I’ve published in the last month:

Fish Bites Cops! by David James Keaton. Interview published 4/12/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

Understories by Tim Horvath. Interview published 27/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

My Pet Serial Killer and The Laughter of Strangers by Michael J Seidlinger. Interview published 21/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

The House Enters the Street by Gretchen Henderson. Interview published 16/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

The Shape of Blue by Liz Scheid. Interview published 6/11/2013 at Monkeybicycle.

Can’t believe it’s been so long since I updated, especially since I planned on doing it every day during November.

Anyrate, as many of you know, I’ve been defrauded. Nate Tower and so many others have helped me organise a very cool campaign to try to recoup my losses. I’m out $2,000 and I’ll write a proper post about the whole thing later. Maybe this weekend. But, for now, just check out the indiegogo campaign.

So check out The Revenge of the Scammed Anthology.

More than just helping me recoup my losses, it’s full of very cool content. The Anthology is going to be killer and then people like Ryan W Bradley, Charles Spitzack, J David Osborne, and so many others are providing amazing things for backers.

Here’s a list of the anthology contributors:

  • Jesus Angel Garcia
  • David S. Atkinson
  • Allie Marini Batts
  • Ryan W Bradley
  • Paul D Brazil
  • Darlene Campos
  • Garrett Cook
  • Sandy Barrett Ebner
  • Rory Fleming
  • Susan Gibb
  • Michael Gonzalez
  • Amanda Gowin
  • Douglas Hackle
  • Sally Heymann
  • Don Lawson
  • William Lemon
  • h. l. nelson
  • J David Osborne
  • Alex Pruteanu
  • Stephen V Ramey
  • Matt Rowan
  • Robyn Ryle
  • Michael J. Seidlinger
  • Grergory Sherl
  • Ryan Shoemaker
  • Sam Snoek-Brown
  • Ben Tanzer
  • Susan Tepper
  • Refe Tuma
  • Richard Thomas
  • Nathaniel Tower
  • Robert Vaughan

And, if you’re a fan of me doing things, there are all sorts of things I’m personally offering, such as my first novel, Ash Cinema, drawings, paintings, videos of me singing, personal biographies and novellas, and even my editing skills.

So, for this holiday season, help a poor wild ydde out and he’ll repay you in content!

It really means so much to me that this has been put together. I can’t explain how grateful I am and I’ll never be able to thank everyone enough.

So just know I love you and appreciate all you’ve ever done for me.

but if i keep writing reviews

I’ll never get anything else done. Actually, I owe three more that I need to get done soon. Anycase, two went up at Word Riot the other day. Also, finally got back into the novel. 5,000 words today. Meant to get 10,000 but this is a good start and I’ll probably get another thousand or two down tonight, hopefully, and make up the rest over the next couple days.

But, yes, the reviews.

Monogamy Songs by Gregory Sherl:

Gregory Sherl’s Monogamy Songs is a memoir masquerading as novel masquerading as collection of prosepoems or perhaps it is none of those things or perhaps all of them but in reverse. Perhaps it is the first mixtape in his soon to be announced rap career or a mixtape he made from the collected scribblings of a lonely and broken heart meant for friends or new lovers about former lovers. It is a constantly surprising and confounding read, so distinct, even from itself, that there is really no proper way to categorise what it does or what Sherl attempts to do here.

My Pet Serial Killer by Michael J Seidlinger:

I am not a fan of serial killer fiction or even, really, transgressive literature. I find that they tend to be done more for shock and the grotesque than for any larger purpose, be it critical or satirical or academic. And so, though I was excited for Seidlinger’s new novel, I had serious reservations, reservations that he quickly shattered by subverting all expectations and invigorating a topic I thought best left to documentarians and forensic psychologists.

And then a few new reviews of my novel Ash Cinema have gone up at goodreads:

DB Cox

I’ve already remarked on this book elsewhere, so I’m not going into the story proper.

Once upon a time, writers were described in terms of their “vision.” “Vision” implied overtones more of purpose and truth, than technique or style. A writer with “vision” could sometimes break through the noise of the crowd—someone who knew why he or she wrote a particular story. I believe Ash Cinema fits this description.

The prose in this book is as beautiful as anything I’ve ever read (including Thomas Wolfe’s “Look Homeard Angel” and “Of Time and the River”). I believe Mr. Rathke is destined to be someone special—what some would call a writer’s writer. So he probably can’t look forward to making a lot of money in the “real world.” But maybe he’ll have a passionate cult following.

Here’s to old Edward J.

Pete Anderson

Ash Cinema tangentially addresses the life of the fictional avant-garde filmmaker Sebastian Falke, from three very different perspectives: an old man who once collaborated on Falke’s films; a woman who was formerly the platonic lover (lover, that is, in everything but the physical sense) of a writer who was obsessed with finding Falke and his long-lost films; and the teenage girl who was Falke’s lover at the very end of his life. Though (tangentially) about Falke, the book is really about grief, longing and trying to bring lost loves back across decades through writing about them. The book is haunting, obsessive, mournful and yet somehow triumphant, and eloquently and passionately written. A thoroughly impressive debut novel from a very talented young writer.

So, yes, very kind things being said about my little novel. Go pick it up at KUBOA Press or for free right here.

Also, music: